Olive Leaf Fried Rice

The olive leaves used in this dish is actually from a jar. I’m super sure it’s laden with dubious preservatives or chemicals I don’t want to know but it’s really too delicious a condiment to pass up. It’s great with porridge as well as when cooked together with rice. Or, fried with rice in this case.

Olive leaf fried rice

What you will need:

olive leaf
There are many different brands of the same thing but alas, all of them contain MSG and a boatload of preservatives.
yogic diet
Some of these fried soya bean skin which I bought from a chinese vegetarian stall.

Cooking time: 20 mins tops. Serves 1.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 and half chinese bowls of pre-cooked fried rice, always use more than what you normally eat for fried rice or you’ll regret it
  • shredded cabbage aka koh-leh-cai, the big round type
  • shredded carrot
  • oyster mushrooms cut to size
  • firm tofu, diced
  • a tbsp of olive leaves from jar, watch out it’s saltish
  • ginger and garlic slices
  • green chilli slices
  • oil for cooking
  • turmeric powder
  • salt and pepper

METHOD:

  1. Fry the ginger and garlic slices in hot oil till garlic begins to colour.
  2. Add cabbage, carrots, oyster mushrooms, and tofu and stir-fry. Dash in a bit of water to create steam to bring out the juices.
  3. Raise the heat, and add in the rice, breaking up any lumps. Add the olive leaves and turmeric and continue to stir-fry before finally adding green chillies and seasoning.

If you like, you can serve like I did with a dollop of yoghurt and fried soya bean skin. The yoghurt is a great compliment to the numeric and green chillies.

A teeny-weeny secret

And now for a secret to making the most perfect fried rice which must be full of the wok/pan-heat and where the rice grains are all separated and not clumpy. Each grain in an ideal fried rice should be glossy with oil.

Cook a batch of white rice to perfection the day before and fridge it overnight in an airtight container. This allows the grains to further dry out and ‘harden’ which in Chinese is ‘ying’. If you cooked the rice with just the right amount of water, all clumps will come apart beautifully the next day to give you individual grains.

The traditional but wicked way in Chinese restaurants is to just chuck leftover rice under a shelf somewhere in the kitchen and  use that overnight or even several days’ old rice for Fried Rice. Delicious though it is, unfortunately, that’s also how you can get salmonella food poisoning called, aptly, Fried Rice Syndrome. So, don’t keep the rice in the fridge beyond a day, and always use an airtight container.

Let me know how it goes should you give this recipe a try. Enjoy!

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