1960-style granny square vest

1960 Paul McCartney Style Crochet Vest

It was Paul McCartney’s iconic crochet vest that inspired me to make one during a super long weekend. Made with the classic granny squares just like the ones in his vest, mine turned out to be a very pleasant surprise especially when it was another one of those off-the-top-of-my-head projects just letting the creative juice take me wherever it needed to go.

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Heads up! Right at the bottom of this post is my video tutorial on how to create the picot edging, so don’t miss it. The finished vest measures 15 inches across the shoulder, 20 inches from shoulder to hip, and 35 inches all along the bottom edge. Like Paul McCartney’s vest, it’s not meant to button close and is worn as an open vest.

So with 4 days in a row away from work, the super long weekend was perfect to bring out my stash of CROWN brand acrylic yarns.

granny vest
33 colours and still counting….

There’s something about the classic granny square which I have noticed. I love this particular pattern because they remind me of Nanny McPhee and that glorious blanket. Plus, they are so simple to make and in any combination of colours which is just up my street. I love colours and how they make me feel. Best part is there is no right or wrong how you decide to mix the colors.

granny vest

Sure enough, the squares started piling up….

granny vest
It’s easy to build a pile quickly with grannies. But look! The black border is a bit stark.

…. using only the classic granny design which you can see from my drawing below.

granny vest

I also added a border of DCs to each square. First, using a black yarn but that came across as too stark so I went to the shop and got a light grey instead. It’s a Hayfield Sundance DK yarn, soft as anything, which I eventually used for all the borders as well as the joining. I was right about using a lighter colour to bring out the bright colours of the square. It was a good neutral sort of colour.

For the joints, I experimented with using just DCs but that didn’t work out well. The joints were too stiff so that meant I needed something a little more lacy but not too lacy. I wanted a warm vest with not too many ‘holes’ in it. In the end I just created chains to connect the squares, spacing them out in a V-formation. Turned out to be just right.

granny vest
Experimented with 2 different joining methods before deciding on the ‘chain’ join.

From here on, it was a matter of first matching up the squares and joining them up to form the columns, and then joining column to column being careful where the armholes should be. It wasn’t difficult. I remember having to unravel a column only once because I had forgotten that it was meant for the back instead of the front.

granny vest

And then it was done! The finished edge is made up of one row of SCs, followed by a row of DCs, and finished with a darker grey of picots. Here’s the video for the picot edging which I decided I wanted to keep simple.

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